A Qantas passenger jet decided to call ‘mayday’ after running low on fuel travelling from Brisbane to Perth on Monday and being forced to wait in line. The emergency has quickly caused concern by stakeholders that Qantas’s perfect safety record may soon be impacted.

Qantas Flight 933 made the sudden call over concerns about the aircraft’s fuel supply as the aircraft entered the Perth airspace and were informed of a lengthy mid-air queue. The queue saw a further four aircraft ahead waiting to land in the Western Australian city, with the pilots informed it would be a 16-minute wait.

In an effort to get to the front of the line, the “low fuel event” emergency was announced, prompting Air Traffic Control to allow for a priority landing for the Boeing-737-838.

Qantas flight between brisbane and perth call mayday before landing
Qantas Flight 933 from Brisbane to Perth declared “mayday” while in a mid-air queue waiting to land. © Flightradar24

Investigations are underway following safety concerns

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has stated they are currently investigating the event. In an early statement, the Bureau announced it saw the emergency declared near Wave Rock. However, the aircraft was able to land successfully with all reserves intact.

The aircraft was reported to have landed with 40 minutes of fuel left, stated to be above the Civil Aviation Safety Authority’s minimum requirements for landing.

The call comes just days after Qantas lost its top five global ranking of the world’s best airlines. The airline fell from fourth to sixth place in AirlineRatings.com’s latest annual scorecard announcement, pushed by complaints of delayed flights and lost baggage.

Qantas CEO Alan Joyce is yet to make comment about the incident, leaving Australian consumers frustrated that the safety of the airline is not being recognised. Joyce has recently been under fire for bonuses to the board, leaving frontline staff under pressure. The ‘mayday’ incident has also caused speculation as to where other costs are being cut.

The investigation is yet to be concluded, with the final findings not expected to be completed until next year.

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