Stockholm-based fuel company Swedish Biofuels has recently announced plans to bring 400,000 metric tons of sustainable aviation fuel annually to the Swedish market. 

They’ll achieve this by building three new plans that will produce alcohol-to-jet fuel. 

Further details 

Swedish Biofuels typically produce sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) from waste, primarily from forest residues. The company has a positive reputation. According to its website, it has a strong patent base for the production of green biofuels from biomass, including grain crops, agricultural waste, wood and forestry waste.

The new plants will produce alcohol-to-jet (ATJ) fuel. ATJ is a biofuel technology that produces jet fuel from sugary, starchy, and lignocellulosic biomass, such as sugarcane, corn grain, and switchgrass, via fermentation of sugars to ethanol or other alcohols. 

Construction of the first of three plants has started thanks to funding support from the European Commission. It is thought that the new plant will start delivering fuel in 2025. 

The company has partnered with the consulting group COWI, which will provide funding and welcome expertise in project management, planning, and construction of the plants. 

Interestingly, Swedish Biofuels invented the original AJT-SAF production system. They are now looking to gain relevant approval for a new alcohol-to-jet process that produces synthetic kerosene which contains aromatic hydrocarbons (ATJ-SKA). If approved, the new type of SAF will be a 100% replacement for fossil jet fuel. 

The new plants will produce the new ATJ-SKA SAF from industrial off-gases and green hydrogen. In order for the entire process to be as efficient as possible, the company plans to capture excess heat from SAF production to be delivered to energy company Stockholm Exergi to heat homes in the city. 

Swedish Biofuels clearly have bold ambitions to produce SAF in a new and even more efficient way. 

Let us know what you think about this story in the comments below. 

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